Hoogstraat 405 Eindhoven-5654 NE Netherlands
PLASTIC CULTURE
Nearly 0,01% of global arable lands are used for the production of bioplastic, and this is a trend in the next three years will grow by more than double. But If we transformed all the plastic produced each year 400 million tons into PLA (Polylactic-Acid), it would serve an agricultural area of 162 million Hectares as big as Argentina. That is 12% of the total global arable land 1.4 billion Hectares. This undoubtedly has an impact on deforestation that is partly occurring, but also on the aquifers and on people caused by the intensive use of fertilizers and pesticides.
Palaquium gutta Euphorbia Cyparissias Castilla Elastica Solidago Altissima Manihot carthaginensis
Taraxacum Officinalis Scorzonera Hispanica Lactarius Delicious
Plastic Culture: We harvesting latex based vegetables, in order to produce food and natural Bio-polymers from the same plant. Aiming for a green, organic, non-toxic, oil-free and gluten-free revolution. Bioplastic is posed as a sustainable alternative to petrol based plastics, and will be produced in exponentially increasing quantities in the coming years. Rice, potatoes, corn, and cassava are considered the most efficient and resilient for the manufacture of PLA in particular. Yet turning food into inedible material is problematic from environmental, economic, and ethical perspectives. As the world's population grows, its survival will rely on a corresponding growth in agricultural land. The problem is even more absurd considering that PLA is used to make disposable products... "we are wasting food to produce objects designed to be wasted". This project proposes a different method: to grow edible plants that also contain latex, thus harvesting both raw bioplastic and food, without wasting life-sustaining carbohydrates. The research explored the ideal plants for this system, such as Dandelion and Scorzonera, which are both highly nutritious and contain a high amount of latex. Scorzonera was also discovered to be a source of EVA, a non-toxic, antibacterial and potentially biodegradable thermoplastic that could replace elastic, flexible, and spongy plastics made of synthetic polymers. The project lays out the design for a large-scale, automated vertical farm owned collectively by local citizens, returning agency over the allocation of agricultural land and its financial profits to the people affected by its larger consequences. By realising an alternative to private capitalism, the vertical farm will not only produce bioplastic and food more cheaply, but also find a constructive context for industrialisation, automation, and technological advancement. Curated by Tamar Shafrir The system I propose is based on another principle; I’m using the latex which is a natural biopolymer produced by over 12,500 plants, instead of converting carbohydrates into bioplastic. In this way, we can have both advantages, get the raw material, and save the food. The plants that I have selected for my ideal vertical farm are the Taraxacum, and the Scorzonera which are vegetables that contain in their roots a high percentage of latex, and above all have high nutritional values.
Campanula Americana Argemone Mexicana Asclepias Syriaca
Hoogstraat 405 Eindhoven-5654 NE Netherlands
PLASTIC CULTURE
Plastic Culture: We harvesting latex based vegetables, in order to produce food and natural Bio-polymers from the same plant. Aiming for a green, organic, non-toxic, oil-free and gluten-free revolution. Bioplastic is posed as a sustainable alternative to petrol based plastics, and will be produced in exponentially increasing quantities in the coming years. Rice, potatoes, corn, and cassava are considered the most efficient and resilient for the manufacture of PLA in particular. Yet turning food into inedible material is problematic from environmental, economic, and ethical perspectives. As the world's population grows, its survival will rely on a corresponding growth in agricultural land. The problem is even more absurd considering that PLA is used to make disposable products... "we are wasting food to produce objects designed to be wasted". This project proposes a different method: to grow edible plants that also contain latex, thus harvesting both raw bioplastic and food, without wasting life-sustaining carbohydrates. The research explored the ideal plants for this system, such as Dandelion and Scorzonera, which are both highly nutritious and contain a high amount of latex. Scorzonera was also discovered to be a source of EVA, a non-toxic, antibacterial and potentially biodegradable thermoplastic that could replace elastic, flexible, and spongy plastics made of synthetic polymers. The project lays out the design for a large-scale, automated vertical farm owned collectively by local citizens, returning agency over the allocation of agricultural land and its financial profits to the people affected by its larger consequences. By realising an alternative to private capitalism, the vertical farm will not only produce bioplastic and food more cheaply, but also find a constructive context for industrialisation, automation, and technological advancement. Curated by Tamar Shafrir
Nearly 0,01% of global arable lands are used for the production of bioplastic, and this is a trend in the next three years will grow by more than double. But If we transformed all the plastic produced each year 400 million tons into PLA (Polylactic-Acid), it would serve an agricultural area of 162 million Hectares as big as Argentina. That is 12% of the total global arable land 1.4 billion Hectares. This undoubtedly has an impact on deforestation that is partly occurring, but also on the aquifers and on people caused by the intensive use of fertilizers and pesticides. The system I propose is based on another principle; I’m using the latex which is a natural biopolymer produced by over 12,500 plants, instead of converting carbohydrates into bioplastic. In this way, we can have both advantages, get the raw material, and save the food. The plants that I have selected for my ideal vertical farm are the Taraxacum, and the Scorzonera which are vegetables that contain in their roots a high percentage of latex, and above all have high nutritional values.
Palaquium gutta Euphorbia Cyparissias Campanula Americana Solidago Altissima Argemone Mexicana Asclepias Syriaca Taraxacum Officinalis Scorzonera Hispanica Lactarius Delicious Castilla Elastica Manihot carthaginensis
Hoogstraat 405 Eindhoven-5654 NE Netherlands

PLASTIC CULTURE

Plastic Culture: We harvesting latex based vegetables, in order to produce food and natural Bio-polymers from the same plant. Aiming for a green, organic, non-toxic, oil-free and gluten-free revolution. Bioplastic is posed as a sustainable alternative to petrol based plastics, and will be produced in exponentially increasing quantities in the coming years. Rice, potatoes, corn, and cassava are considered the most efficient and resilient for the manufacture of PLA in particular. Yet turning food into inedible material is problematic from environmental, economic, and ethical perspectives. As the world's population grows, its survival will rely on a corresponding growth in agricultural land. The problem is even more absurd considering that PLA is used to make disposable products... "we are wasting food to produce objects designed to be wasted". This project proposes a different method: to grow edible plants that also contain latex, thus harvesting both raw bioplastic and food, without wasting life-sustaining carbohydrates. The research explored the ideal plants for this system, such as Dandelion and Scorzonera, which are both highly nutritious and contain a high amount of latex. Scorzonera was also discovered to be a source of EVA, a non-toxic, antibacterial and potentially biodegradable thermoplastic that could replace elastic, flexible, and spongy plastics made of synthetic polymers. The project lays out the design for a large-scale, automated vertical farm owned collectively by local citizens, returning agency over the allocation of agricultural land and its financial profits to the people affected by its larger consequences. By realising an alternative to private capitalism, the vertical farm will not only produce bioplastic and food more cheaply, but also find a constructive context for industrialisation, automation, and technological advancement. Curated by Tamar Shafrir Nearly 0,01% of global arable lands are used for the production of bioplastic, and this is a trend in the next three years will grow by more than double. But If we transformed all the plastic produced each year 400 million tons into PLA (Polylactic-Acid), it would serve an agricultural area of 162 million Hectares as big as Argentina. That is 12% of the total global arable land 1.4 billion Hectares. This undoubtedly has an impact on deforestation that is partly occurring, but also on the aquifers and on people caused by the intensive use of fertilizers and pesticides. The system I propose is based on another principle; I’m using the latex which is a natural biopolymer produced by over 12,500 plants, instead of converting carbohydrates into bioplastic. In this way, we can have both advantages, get the raw material, and save the food. The plants that I have selected for my ideal vertical farm are the Taraxacum, and the Scorzonera which are vegetables that contain in their roots a high percentage of latex, and above all have high nutritional values.
Palaquium gutta Euphorbia Cyparissias Campanula Americana Solidago Altissima Argemone Mexicana Asclepias Syriaca Taraxacum Officinalis Scorzonera Hispanica Lactarius Delicious Castilla Elastica Manihot carthaginensis
Hoogstraat 405 Eindhoven-5654 NE Netherlands PLASTIC CULTURE Plastic Culture: We harvesting latex based vegetables, in order to produce food and natural Bio-polymers from the same plant. Aiming for a green, organic, non-toxic, oil-free and gluten-free revolution. Bioplastic is posed as a sustainable alternative to petrol based plastics, and will be produced in exponentially increasing quantities in the coming years. Rice, potatoes, corn, and cassava are considered the most efficient and resilient for the manufacture of PLA in particular. Yet turning food into inedible material is problematic from environmental, economic, and ethical perspectives. As the world's population grows, its survival will rely on a corresponding growth in agricultural land. The problem is even more absurd considering that PLA is used to make disposable products... "we are wasting food to produce objects designed to be wasted". This project proposes a different method: to grow edible plants that also contain latex, thus harvesting both raw bioplastic and food, without wasting life-sustaining carbohydrates. The research explored the ideal plants for this system, such as Dandelion and Scorzonera, which are both highly nutritious and contain a high amount of latex. Scorzonera was also discovered to be a source of EVA, a non-toxic, antibacterial and potentially biodegradable thermoplastic that could replace elastic, flexible, and spongy plastics made of synthetic polymers. The project lays out the design for a large-scale, automated vertical farm owned collectively by local citizens, returning agency over the allocation of agricultural land and its financial profits to the people affected by its larger consequences. By realising an alternative to private capitalism, the vertical farm will not only produce bioplastic and food more cheaply, but also find a constructive context for industrialisation, automation, and technological advancement. Curated by Tamar Shafrir Nearly 0,01% of global arable lands are used for the production of bioplastic, and this is a trend in the next three years will grow by more than double. But If we transformed all the plastic produced each year 400 million tons into PLA (Polylactic-Acid), it would serve an agricultural area of 162 million Hectares as big as Argentina. That is 12% of the total global arable land 1.4 billion Hectares. This undoubtedly has an impact on deforestation that is partly occurring, but also on the aquifers and on people caused by the intensive use of fertilizers and pesticides.
Asclepias Syriaca Argemone Mexicana
Castilla Elastica Palaquium gutta
The system I propose is based on another principle; I’m using the latex which is a natural biopolymer produced by over 12,500 plants, instead of converting carbohydrates into bioplastic. In this way, we can have both advantages, get the raw material, and save the food. The plants that I have selected for my ideal vertical farm are the Taraxacum, and the Scorzonera which are vegetables that contain in their roots a high percentage of latex, and above all have high nutritional values.
Taraxacum Officinalis Scorzonera Hispanica
Campanula Americana Solidago Altissima
Euphorbia Cyparissias Manihot carthaginensis
Lactarius Delicious
Hoogstraat 405 Eindhoven-5654 NE Netherlands
Plastic Culture: We harvesting latex based vegetables, in order to produce food and natural Bio-polymers from the same plant. Aiming for a green, organic, non-toxic, oil-free and gluten-free revolution. Bioplastic is posed as a sustainable alternative to petrol based plastics, and will be produced in exponentially increasing quantities in the coming years. Rice, potatoes, corn, and cassava are considered the most efficient and resilient for the manufacture of PLA in particular. Yet turning food into inedible material is problematic from environmental, economic, and ethical perspectives. As the world's population grows, its survival will rely on a corresponding growth in agricultural land. The problem is even more absurd considering that PLA is used to make disposable products... "we are wasting food to produce objects designed to be wasted". This project proposes a different method: to grow edible plants that also contain latex, thus harvesting both raw bioplastic and food, without wasting life-sustaining carbohydrates. The research explored the ideal plants for this system, such as Dandelion and Scorzonera, which are both highly nutritious and contain a high amount of latex. Scorzonera was also discovered to be a source of EVA, a non-toxic, antibacterial and potentially biodegradable thermoplastic that could replace elastic, flexible, and spongy plastics made of synthetic polymers. The project lays out the design for a large-scale, automated vertical farm owned collectively by local citizens, returning agency over the allocation of agricultural land and its financial profits to the people affected by its larger consequences. By realising an alternative to private capitalism, the vertical farm will not only produce bioplastic and food more cheaply, but also find a constructive context for industrialisation, automation, and technological advancement. Curated by Tamar Shafrir
Nearly 0,01% of global arable lands are used for the production of bioplastic, and this is a trend in the next three years will grow by more than double. But If we transformed all the plastic produced each year 400 million tons into PLA (Polylactic-Acid), it would serve an agricultural area of 162 million Hectares as big as Argentina. That is 12% of the total global arable land 1.4 billion Hectares. This undoubtedly has an impact on deforestation that is partly occurring, but also on the aquifers and on people caused by the intensive use of fertilizers and pesticides. The system I propose is based on another principle; I’m using the latex which is a natural biopolymer produced by over 12,500 plants, instead of converting carbohydrates into bioplastic. In this way, we can have both advantages, get the raw material, and save the food. The plants that I have selected for my ideal vertical farm are the Taraxacum, and the Scorzonera which are vegetables that contain in their roots a high percentage of latex, and above all have high nutritional values. Palaquium gutta Euphorbia Cyparissias Campanula Americana Solidago Altissima Argemone Mexicana Asclepias Syriaca Taraxacum Officinalis Scorzonera Hispanica Lactarius Delicious Castilla Elastica Manihot carthaginensis